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Saul David was born in Monmouth in 1966 and educated at Ampleforth College and Edinburgh and Glasgow Universities (History MA and PhD).

He began writing his first history book when he was twenty-five and has since completed eleven more (one edited). They include: The Homicidal Earl: The Life of Lord Cardigan (1997), a critically-acclaimed biography of the man who led the Charge of the Light Brigade; The Indian Mutiny:1857 (2002), shortlisted for the Westminster Medal for Military Literature; Zulu: The Heroism and Tragedy of the Zulu War of 1879 (2004), a Waterstone’s Military History Book of the Year; Victoria’s Wars: The Rise of Empire (2006); All the King’s Men: The British Redcoat in the Era of Sword and Musket (2012): and 100 Days to Victory: How the Great War was Fought and Won, 1914-1918 (2013). He has also written two historical novels set in the late Victorian period. The  Times described the first, Zulu Hart (2009), as a ‘rattling good yarn’ with ‘a compelling, sexy hero who could give Cornwell’s Sharpe a run for his money’. His latest history –  Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe’- was published in the UK on 2 July 2015 to rave reviews.

An experienced broadcaster, Saul appears often on British radio and television. His TV presenting credits include the Escape From… series for Five (2004), Sky One’s genealogy series So You Think You’re Royal? (2007) and three programmes for the BBC’s flagship history series Timewatch: The Queen’s Lover (2001), The Greatest Knight (2008) and the Queen Elizabeth’s Lost Guns (February 2009). He was an on-screen expert on BBC2’s virtual battle series Time Commanders (2004) and is a regular contributor to history programmes on all channels. Two of his books – Mutiny at Salerno and Zulu – have been made into documentaries. More recently he presented Filton’s Fabulous Flying Machines for BBC1 (June 2010) and How The Rest Got Home, a 70th anniversary programme about the British soldiers who escaped from France after Dunkirk, for Radio 4 (June 2010).  His 3 x 1 hour series on the history of military logistics – Bullets, Boots and Bandages: How Wars are Really Won – was aired on BBC4 in February 2012. In 2014 he presented a documentary on World War One horses for BBC4 and appeared in a Channel 5 film on The First Great Escape and two episodes of BBC2’s The Birth of Empire. In 2015 he featured in programmes on the Spanish Armada, the Duke of Wellington, the Battle of Waterloo, the history of Spain and the secret rescue of Ethiopia’s Jews. In 2106 he will present World War Two: A Timewatch Guide and appear in a six-part series on Adolf Hitler.

Saul gives frequent talks about military history and has spoken at all the major literary festivals. He has also lectured at the Security Service (MI5), the National Army Musuem and the Imperial War Museum. He has led history tours to India and the Crimea, and has appeared as a guest speaker on The World ship.

Saul is Professor of Military History at the University of Buckingham and Programme Director for Buckingham’s London-based MPhil in Military History.

He lives in Somerset with his wife and three daughters.